National Water Hygiene Course

Course Content

The course comprises four modules

  1. The importance of water
  2. Water as a carrier of disease
  3. Possible contamination and its consequences
  4. Prevention of drinking water contamination – safeguarding the water supply

Module 1
The importance of water

Asks people to think about the definition of healthy water and draw attention to its importance as a source of food and the impact of a world without clean water. The aim is to educate individuals about the scarcity of clean water and the role water plays in maintaining a healthy and functioning society.

Module 2
Water a potential carrier of diseaser

Ask people to think about the definition of healthy water and draw attention to its importance as a source of food and the impact of a world without clean water. The aim is to educate individuals about the scarcity of clean water and the role water plays in maintaining a healthy and functioning society. Examples included are the Broad Street Pump outbreak in Soho, London in 1854 and the Milwaukee Cryptosporidium outbreak in 1993 (the largest documented waterborne disease outbreak in US history). Enforcement of drinking water legislation in England and Wales is covered by a brief discussion on the work of the Drinking Water Inspectorate.

Module 3
Possible contamination of drinking water and its consequences

Investigates the potential sources of drinking water contamination across all sectors of the UK water industry and the consequences should contamination occur.

Module 4
Prevention of drinking water contamination – safeguarding the water supply

Examines the steps a person visiting a waterworks or working on a water mains can take to prevent contamination of drinking water supplies. Broader, more general actions that individuals can take to ensure water quality, as well as providing specific examples of work practices that can be applied in a small number of high-risk scenarios. Regulation 31 of the Water Supply (Water Quality) Regulations concerning approved substances in contact with potable water is examined so that attendees under the complexities of this regulation and the potential impact on the business.

Health assessment and screening

Any person required to work in restricted facilities must complete a standardised health assessment questionnaire. This includes those working on plumbing, water treatment jobs, taking water quality samples and anyone who the water company determines may come into contact with the treated water.

Responses to the form that suggest the person may have a waterborne illness will require that the person be referred to their doctor or workplace health department for evaluation.

The trainer makes the final decision as to whether the person is allowed to complete the course. The individual must pass the health screening before registering for the National Water Hygiene Card, and a card is not issued until they pass both the health screening and the test.